Intern Highlight: Roselie Agulto

Sept 4, 2021 Name: Roselie Agulto  University: Portland State University Major: Public Health  Expected Graduation Date: August 2021 Hometown: Saipan, Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas Islands Why did you choose your major? I chose to study public health because I knew that I wanted to pursue a career where I could impact the lives of many in my community. Living in the Islands where resources are scarce, it’s difficult to stay healthy and have all your needs met. Disease and short life expectancies are disproportionate burdens across the Pacific Islands and that is something that I am passionate about changing in the future. Through public health, I know that I could do just that, by implementing programs and pushing for policies that will encourage healthier behaviors and lifestyles.  Why is it important to have more women’s representation in politics? It is important to have more women’s representation in politics because women bring unique experiences, skills and knowledge to the table. Women have been historically underrepresented in many areas, including politics, which have resulted in discriminatory and inequitable laws and policies that harm them. It is necessary that more women are represented in politics in order to reform and revise laws so that we can create a more inclusive and equitable society. I believe more women in political leadership roles are also essential because they place greater priority on women’s rights and create pathways towards gender equality.  Have you learned something during your internship with Latinas Represent that you didn’t know before? The most surprising thing I learned was that women face a lot of challenges when running for office. Some barriers include women having to leave their full-time jobs to commit to campaigning;  not being able to afford unpaid internships; lack of empowerment; family and caregiving responsibilities, etc. Organizations like…

Intern Spotlight: Karina González Rosales

Jun 15, 2021 Name: Karina González Rosales University: University of California, San Diego Major: Sociology: Law & Society & Human Rights Minor Expected Graduation Date: June 2021 Hometown: San Diego, California Why did you choose your major? Sociology was the perfect major for me because it gave me the tools to not only analyze society and its various systems and structures, but also the role that the legal system plays within society. I acknowledge that as a woman of color, many spaces within our society were intended to keep people like myself out—including higher education. That is why studying these intersecting social relationships and their origins fascinates me. Why is the issue of Latina representation in politics (and beyond) important to you? While Latinos make up about 18% of the U.S. population, less than 5% of those in Congress identify as Latino. Representation is crucial to the well-being of our democracy and communities. Latinas are strong, fearless women and our unique skills and experiences are needed now more than ever not just in politics, but in every sector. Seeing women of color in politics empowers other young women and girls and shows them that their voices matter. Most importantly, it also encourages other Latinas to become politically engaged at all levels—especially locally. Have you learned something during your internship with Latinas Represent that you didn’t know before? One of the most valuable lessons I learned during my time at LatinasRepresent is how much support is out there for women—especially women of color—who decide to either run for public office or get involved in their communities in one way or another. There are so many organizations full of experts and resources who are more than ready to help in any way. Politics can be a challenging environment but having a team…

Intern Spotlight: Kenia Perea

Jun 15, 2021 Name: Kenia Perea  University: University of California, Irvine  Major: Sociology and Social Policy & Public Service  Expected Graduation Date: June 2021 Hometown: Chula Vista, CA Why did you choose your major? As a first-generation Latina immigrant and college student, I have firsthand experience with systems of oppression in both the justice and education systems. In college, I wanted to examine and understand how these institutional systems came to be and how they impact the lives of marginalized communities, which is why I chose to major in Sociology. As I began to learn about theories and societal structures, I wanted to find a way in which I could apply my theoretical understanding of issues that impact immigrant and Latino communities, which is why I decided to add social policy and public service as my other major.  Why is the issue of Latina representation in politics (and beyond) important to you? Greater Latina representation in politics creates a vehicle for our voices to be heard and leads to political change via the creation of laws and policies that have the wellbeing of our communities in mind. In addition, I believe that greater Latina representation will encourage more Latinas from all walks of life to become more politically active, whether that be running for office, organizing politically, creating non-profit organizations, or encouraging their community to go and vote.  Have you learned something during your internship with Latinas Represent that you didn’t know before? Coming into my internship with Latinas Represent, I was under the impression that all state legislators earned similar base salaries for their roles in their respective state legislatures. I was shocked to learn about the significant degree of variance in legislator salaries among the 50 states, ranging from $100,000 a year to $100 a year or simply…

Intern Spotlight: Stephanie Arely Zacatares

Apr 30, 2021 Name: Stephanie Arely Zacatares University: University of California, Santa Barbara  Major: Sociology Expected Graduation Date: June 2021 Hometown: Long Beach, California Why did you choose your major? As a first-generation, transfer student, I did not have any tools to succeed when I first started college. I began my journey as a biology major in hopes of earning a Bachelor of Science in Nursing. I struggled with my grades for many semesters because I did not find the material interesting. Then in 2017, Temporary Protected Status (TPS) was terminated for El Salvador, which meant that my dad was at risk of deportation. I began to engage with my community and organize with the National TPS Alliance, which led me to aspire to work in public policy or law. I decided to center my career aspirations towards advocating for immigrant families like my own and switched my major to Sociology. Since then, I’ve earned associate degrees in Political Science, Social Behavior Science, and Sociology. Currently, I am finishing my Bachelors in Sociology with aspirations of attending law school.  Why is it important to increase Latina representation in politics? Latina representation in politics is vital for our community.  Increasing Latina representation is also critical for building a foundation for future Latinas seeking to explore career opportunities. I am the first woman in my family with aspirations to attend law school. Growing up, I did not have role models that were working professionals. Like many women in my community, I was taught to aspire to be a wife and mother. Although these roles are essential, I also want to have a career. Latinas only make up about 2% of working attorneys, a statistic I hope to help increase. I believe it is important to motivate more women in our communities to…

Intern Spotlight: Nicole Herrera-Moro

Apr 29, 2021 University: UC Santa Cruz Major: Latin American Latino Studies & Spanish Studies  Expected Graduation Date: June 2021 Hometown: Napa, CA Why did you choose your major? I decided to major in Latin American Latino Studies to further my understanding of my identity as a Mexicana and to learn about the histories, politics, cultures, and societies of Latin America and the Caribbean, as well the diaspora.  My Spanish studies double major has also been a way for me to communicate and connect with my family, friends, and community members. It has allowed me to develop linguistic competence and cultural literacy to understand the perspectives of Spanish-speaking communities in the United States, Latin America, and Spain.   Latinos are more likely to play in online casinos. According to a recent study, Latinos are more likely to play in online casinos than any other group. The study, which was conducted by the University of Nevada, found that Latinos are twice as likely as non-Latinos to play in online casinos. There are several reasons for this. First, Latinos tend to be early adopters of new technology in online casino https://onlinecasinos333.com/best-payout-online-casinos/. They are also more likely to live in states with legal online casino gambling, such as Nevada and New Jersey. Finally, Latinos tend to have higher levels of disposable income than other groups. This trend is likely to continue in the future. As more states legalize online gambling, and as Latino incomes continue to rise, we expect that more and more Latinos will turn to online casinos for their gaming needs. Why is it important to increase Latina representation in politics? Latina representation in any field, but especially in politics, is necessary because it demonstrates that Latinas are capable leaders who should be in decision-making spaces. Women of color who run for…

Brenda Lopez Romero

Latina Profile Name:  Brenda Lopez Romero Political Experience: Georgia General Assembly Representative for District 99 Candidate for the U. S. House of Representatives Location: Gwinnett County, Georgia Degrees:  B.A. in Political Science from Georgia State University J.D. from Syracuse University College of Law Overview: Brenda Lopez Romero was born in Cuernavaca, Mexico. She and her family immigrated to the United States to be reunited with her father when she was about five years old. In 2016, Brenda made history by becoming the first Latina elected to the Georgia General Assembly. In 2020, Brenda ran for election to the U.S. House of Representatives. Although she lost the Democratic primary, she remains driven to serve her community. Her term in the Georgia General Assembly ended in January 2021. NOTE: This interview has been edited and condensed for the sake of length, clarity and formatting. What motivated you to run for the Georgia State Legislature? I ran in 2015 and got elected in 2016 to the State House District 99. Honestly, I had been doing advocacy work and volunteer work, but it had never occurred to me to run for office. I actually had never been involved in party politics or electoral issues or campaigns. But in 2014, we had an election here, and I had a friend call me and ask if I could help him with outreach engagement in minority communities. So I did that to help my friend. After that election, I had someone call me and say that I should consider running for [State] House. It had only been about a year and a half since I had started my own law practice, so I said, “This is not a good time for me.” A few months later, the same friend who asked me to help on the campaign…

Intern Spotlight: Christina Velazquez

Dec 23, 2020 Name: Christina Velazquez University: Florida International University Major: Political Science & Women’s Studies Expected Graduation Date: May 2021 Hometown: Miami, FL Why did you decide to major in political science and what brought you to Latinas Represent? My family has always been very politically active. My dad canvassed for a political campaign, and we went to hear the candidate speak when they visited Miami. My mom works for the local government in environmental regulation policy. Once I got to high school and took classes in government and anthropology, I became more political. This is also the time when I started to learn more about the obstacles women face in different areas of their lives. I had no doubt once I got to college that I wanted to study political science while also pursuing another degree in women’s studies to bring my two passions together.  You completed your internship remotely during COVID-19. Others might be pursuing these opportunities during the pandemic. Can you tell us what a typical day looks like for you as a student and intern during COVID-19? COVID-19 has completely changed the typical college experience. Previously, I found myself running around campus between soccer practice, class, work and other on-campus events. Now, much of my time is spent in front of the computer, usually in my room. However, the remote format allows me to be involved in opportunities, like this internship with LatinasRepresent, that I otherwise would not have been able to do because of location and time constraints.   How do you find your community in college? Miami is a unique city where Latinx communities and immigrants dominate almost every space. Florida International University is an extension of that since over 60 percent of our students are Hispanic. Thus, my experience of finding my community…

Make a Voting Plan

Oct 23, 2020 This election year has been filled with unprecedented challenges but it’s also one of the most consequential elections in our lifetime and voting is more important than ever. The global pandemic along with other factors such as postal service cutbacks, rampant misinformation, and concerns about voter intimidation have made this election cycle unique. We want to ensure that every single person, who is eligible to vote, can do so safely. That’s why we encourage everyone to make a voting plan. Whether you plan to vote early, by mail, or on election day, a voting plan will make the process easier.  A voting plan is as simple as deciding how and when you will vote. It’s not enough to just be registered to vote, you must also have a detailed plan in place to ensure that your vote is counted and that you know what to do if issues arise. Since state deadlines vary, we recommend that you double-check your voter registration, vote-by-mail, and postmark deadlines. Once you have registered to vote, make sure you also check your voter registration status, polling location address, and identification requirements. Now that you have this information, you can follow our guide to help create a voting plan that works for you! In-Person Voting How to Plan: Decide whether you will be voting early or on election day. Check your polling location address and find out what days and hours they are open. Polling location information can be found through your local elections office. Find your local election office here. Find out if your state requires that employers give employees some time off to vote, either paid or unpaid to cast your ballot. Keep in mind long lines may occur, so set aside a few hours. Determine how you will get to…

Why the 2020 U.S. Census Matters – Casa de Esperanza Podcast

Oct 7, 2020 Casa de Esperanza is a member of the National Hispanic Leadership Agenda (NHLA). They work to mobilize Latin@ communities to build healthy futures and recently launched a new series titled ¡Presente! Empowering Latin@ Communities through Civic Engagement. The series will highlight actionable steps people can take to make a difference in their communities. In this episode, Casa de Esperanza focuses on the 2020 U.S. Census. They speak to Lizette Escobedo, the Director of the National Census Program at the NALEO Educational Fund, which is also a member of the NHLA. Lizette talks about the history, structure, and impact of the Census and why it’s so important for our communities to be counted. Here are five key takeaways from the podcast episode: The Census takes place every ten years and helps determine federal funding, resources, and representation for communities. The data collected is used to draw congressional and state legislative districts, and determine funding for education, healthcare, and other services for our communities for the next ten years. The question about Latino or Hispanic origin didn’t get added to the Census until 1970 as a direct result of various civil rights organizations coming together to fight for representation. This addition was important because it gave civil organizations the opportunity to count the Latino population in the U.S., observe it’s growth, and continue fighting for key civil rights policies using statistical data.  It’s important to ensure that children, including babies, are counted. In the 2010 Census, about 1 million children between the ages of 0 and 4 were not counted in the Census. Of those, nearly 400,000 were Latino children.  The Census is not just for U.S. citizens; the Census counts all people in the U.S., including undocumented folks. All data submitted to the U.S. Census Bureau is protected…

Andrea Flores

Latina Profile Name: Andrea Flores Political Experience: Senior Class President at Texas A&M University (2019) Cedar Hill Planning and Zoning Commissioner Location: Cedar Hill, TX Degree:  B.S. in Agricultural Communication/ Journalism from Texas A&M Training Programs: LBJ Women’s Campaign School, Movement Mujeres Fellow Overview: Andrea is a first-generation graduate from Texas A&M University, where she served as the university’s first Latina Senior Class President. She now serves on Cedar Hill’s Planning and Zoning Board, making her one of the youngest sitting appointed commissioners in Dallas County. She is committed to seeing more women of color represented in politics, which is why she interned at ReflectUS and participated in a variety of women’s fellowship and training programs. She was one of the youngest members of the inaugural class of the LBJ Women’s Campaign School, a training program at the University of Texas at Austin, and was also a Movement Mujeres Fellow. In the future, she plans to go to law school and hopes to run for office. NOTE: This interview has been edited and condensed for the sake of length, clarity, and formatting. You became the first Latina to serve as Senior Class President at Texas A&M. Can you tell us about that experience? When I ran for Senior Class President, I was the only woman running against seven men for the position, and I won by 18 votes. My slogan was “Minorities are Priorities” because I got tired of my friends continuously saying, “I don’t feel like a part of the campus culture and I’m just here to get my degree and leave.” I wanted to change that environment for students of color on campus. So, that’s why I ran, and we were able to make a lot of changes. One example is that I started the Latinx graduation ceremony…